September 6, 2018
Albany, NY

Governor Cuomo Announces More Than $25 Million in Federal Funding to Address Opioid Crisis in New York State

TOP Governor Cuomo Announces More Than $25 Million...

19 Additional Counties Will Receive State Targeted Response Funds to Support Expansion of Addiction Prevention, Treatment and Recovery Services

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Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced the distribution of $25.2 million dollars in federal funding through the Opioid State Targeted Response Grant, which will expand critical initiatives to combat the opioid crisis. In the second year New York State has been awarded this grant, nineteen additional counties have been selected to receive funding. Funding will be distributed to programs that offer prevention, treatment, and recovery services in high-need areas across the state to increase access to treatment, and reduce unmet need and overdose-related deaths.


"This opioid crisis devastates families and entire communities and we must do everything in our power to fight back against this very real threat to New Yorkers," Governor Cuomo said. "It's critical that we continue to lead the nation in implementing new, effective solutions to save lives, and this funding will provide the expanded services and treatment that those suffering from addiction so desperately need."

 

"This significant federal funding will make a big impact on combating the opioid epidemic across the state," said Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul, Co-Chair of the Heroin and Opioid Abuse Task Force. "More than $25 million will be distributed among 19 additional counties to provide critical resources that will increase treatment and recovery services for individuals battling addiction. In New York, we're aggressively fighting to prevent addiction and support recovery efforts, and we will not stop until those who contribute to the crisis are held accountable and all New Yorkers have the access and opportunity to seek recovery and live better and healthier lives."

  

Funding for the Opioid State Targeted Response Grant is administered by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Last year, 16 counties were recipients of the grant funding. This year, 19 additional counties have been identified as having high needs, for a total of 35 counties being supported through the second year of the grant. New counties to receive funding were designated as having high needs based on the number of opioid overdose deaths, hospitalizations involving opioids and residents leaving the county to access addiction treatment services.

 

The 19 counties awarded funding through the second year of the grant are: Suffolk, Broome, Oneida, Orange, Bronx, Cortland, Schenectady, Monroe, Richmond, Genesee, Nassau, Columbia, Kings, Herkimer, New York, Otsego, Dutchess, Queens, and Wayne. These counties will share more than $15 million to increase access to treatment through initiatives that include expanded mobile treatment, telepractice and peer services.

 

The following providers are receiving funding:

 

Capital Region (Schenectady and Columbia Counties)

  • New Choices Recovery Center - $1,042,356
  • Twin County Recovery Services, Inc. - $642,356

 

Central New York and Mohawk Valley (Cortland, Oneida, Otsego and Herkimer Counties)

  • Family Counseling Services of Cortland County, Inc. - $1,250,000
  • Syracuse Brick House - $1,052,310

 

Finger Lakes (Monroe, Wayne and Genesee Counties)

  • Delphi Drug and Alcohol Council, Inc. - $700,000
  • Genesee Council on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse, Inc. - $650,000
  • Wayne County Community Services Board - $700,000

 

Long Island (Nassau and Suffolk Counties)

  • Family Service League - $1,246,990
  • Central Nassau Guidance - $1,250,000

 

Mid-Hudson (Dutchess and Orange Counties)

  • Lexington Recovery Center - $100,000
  • Catholic Charities Community Services of Orange and Sullivan - $982,356

 

New York City (New York, Bronx, Kings, Queens and Richmond Counties)

  • Palladia/SUS - $1,248,493
  • VIP - $197,548
  • New York Therapeutic Communities - $1,345,255
  • Elmcor - $1,000,000
  • Resource Counseling Center - $500,000
  • Community Health Action of Staten Island - $250,000

 

Southern Tier (Broome County)

  • Addiction Center of Broome County - $1,145,674

 

In addition, these high-need counties will share more than $1.3 million to expand medication-assisted treatment and treatment transition for patients in local correctional facilities and state parole violator facilities.

 

The State Targeted Response initiative also includes funding for programs beyond the high-need counties:

 

  • Delivery of evidence-based prevention services to underserved, hard to reach youth and other at-risk populations - $1,114,714
  • Delivery of the Strengthening Families Program to families in New York City shelters and permanent supportive housing - $650,000
  • Delivery of a targeted media campaign to residents, with a focus on tribal territories and Latino communities - $913,173
  • Training of first responders and other likely witnesses to recognize and respond to overdoses, and provide access to naloxone - $401,237
  • Enhanced opioid use disorder services at 11 existing NYSDOH AIDS Institute Health Hubs, and addition of a new Hub on Long Island - $3,015,748
  • Implementation of a new Recovery Center/Youth Clubhouse for a Native American community - $294,290
  • Creation and support of statewide youth and young adult driven infrastructure to support local communities of young people in recovery - $589,325

 

This year's grant funding will continue initiatives introduced in the first year, including the expansion of mobile treatment, telepractice capabilities, peer services, and medication assisted treatment. In the first year of the grant, the following 16 counties were designated as having high needs: Oswego, Yates, Cayuga, Greene, Tioga, Tompkins, Jefferson, Ulster, Sullivan, Madison, Erie, Onondaga, Ontario, Saratoga, Niagara and Montgomery.

 

New York State Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services Commissioner Arlene González-Sánchez said, "Using the funding awarded under the first year of this grant we were able to expand and enhance critical initiatives across New York, and we are looking forward to doing the same in more communities this year. This funding will allow us to support important prevention, treatment, and recovery initiatives to continue Governor Cuomo's vision to combat addiction, and will allow more New Yorkers to access the services they need, closer to where they live."

 

Congressman Eliot Engel said, "The opioid crisis has touched every corner of our state and demands swift action. I am pleased Governor Cuomo is once again addressing the issue. These federal funds will increase access to treatment options and reduce incidences of overdose in New York."

 

Congresswoman Nita Lowey said, "America's opioid epidemic is one of the most significant public health emergencies of our time, destroying lives, breaking apart families, and devastating communities throughout New York. These federal investments are a bold and necessary step forward, providing New York with essential resources to aggressively combat, treat, and prevent the spread of opioid addiction across our state. As Ranking Member on the House Appropriations Committee, which oversees federal funding allocations, I'm proud to have secured these federal funds, and I will continue fighting to expand investments that will protect our communities and save lives."

 

Congressman José E. Serrano said, ""New York State has made great strides in combatting the opioid epidemic that is devastating the nation, but there's still much work to be done. This federal funding will help us continue making progress in our fight against substance abuse in the communities that need it most, making sure that those suffering from addiction have access to the treatment, support, and other resources that they need. I am proud to join Governor Cuomo in announcing these federal grants, which will help ensure a healthier and safer New York for all."

 

Congressman Paul Tonko said, "Prevention, treatment and recovery services are desperately needed to combat the opioid crisis. I am proud to serve in a leading capacity in Congress to fight for this funding at SAMHSA, which benefits New Yorkers and our community by helping those in need. We must continue to use evidence based approaches, including medication assisted treatment, to help reduce dependency and overdoses of opioids."

 

Congresswoman Grace Meng said, "The opioid epidemic continues to impact our state and tear families apart. We must do all we can to combat this crisis and these federal funds will provide critical assistance for New Yorkers who are battling addiction to opioids. I commend Governor Cuomo for working to save lives."

 

Since taking office, Governor Cuomo has instituted an aggressive, multi-pronged approach to addressing the opioid epidemic by expanding access to traditional services, such as treatment programs, and recommending new, non-traditional services, including recovery centers and 24/7 open access centers. The Governor has also worked to increase the availability of naloxone, resulting in more than 300,000 individuals in New York State receiving training to administer the opioid overdose reversal medication.

 

New Yorkers struggling with an addiction, or whose loved ones are struggling, can find help and hope by calling the state's toll-free, 24-hour, 7-day-a-week HOPEline at 1-877-8-HOPENY (1-877-846-7369) or by texting HOPENY (Short Code 467369). 

Available addiction treatment including crisis/detox, inpatient, community residence, or outpatient care can be found using the NYS OASAS Treatment Availability Dashboard at FindAddictionTreatment.ny.gov or through the NYS OASAS website. Visit CombatAddiction.ny.gov to learn more about the warning signs of addiction, review information on how to get help, and access resources on how to facilitate conversations with loved ones and communities about addiction. For tools to use in talking to a young person about preventing alcohol or drug use, visit the State's Talk2Prevent website

 

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